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Productivity, Absence and Disability

Metrics Being Used to Track the Value of Wellness Programs

In the past, many employers have evaluated the success of their wellness programs purely on participation rates and estimated health care cost savings. Now many employers are beginning to expand how they evaluate wellness to include productivity savings, changes in health risks and other business outcomes.

For more information on this chart, please see the National Business Group on Health/Optum’s Beyond ROI, Building the VOI Story for Health & Wellness report.

Highly Effective Companies Have Improved Productivity

Companies that efficiently manage the health and effectiveness of their workforce see productivity savings. These savings can be realized in the form of reduced unplanned absences and higher revenue per employee per year.

For more information on this chart, please see the National Business Group on Health/Towers Watson’s 2013/2014 Staying@Work report.

Medical and Productivity Costs of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses

Injuries and illnesses are  estimated to cost the economy more than a quarter of a trillion dollars each year in medical and productivity costs.

For more information on this chart, please see Economic Burden of Occupational Injury and Illness in the United States.

Most Frequently Disabling Conditions

In the U.S., musculoskeletal/back issues and maternity are the top two reasons for short-term disability claims. The conditions most often cited for long-term disability claims are mental/behavioral health and musculoskeletal/back issues.

For more information on this chart, please see the National Business Group on Health/Towers Watson’s 2011/2012 Staying@Work report.

Health and Productivity Costs as a Percentage of Payroll

The direct and indirect costs of health and productivity have continued to rise, accounting for a greater proportion of payroll costs. Much of that increase is due to increasing medical costs, but the increase in overtime and replacement workers has also had an impact.

For more information on this chart, please see the National Business Group on Health/Towers Watson’s 2011/2012 Staying@Work report.

The Costs of Unplanned Absences

Unplanned absences have wide reaching effects across an organization. Beyond payroll costs, unplanned absences result in productivity losses among coworkers and supervisors scrambling to cover for unexpectedly absent employees.

For more information on this chart, please see the Society for Human Resource Management/Kronos’ Total Financial Impact of Employee Absences in the U.S. report.

State and Local Paid Sick Leave Laws

A number of states and localities have now passed paid sick leave laws. Each state and local have different rules, regulations and reporting requirements in place, increasing the burden on multi-state employers.


For more information on this chart, please see our Local Paid Sick Leave Laws analysis.

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