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Well-Being

Importance of Various Attributes for Employees’ Well-being

When determining one’s overall well-being, employee value certain aspect more highly than others. The majority of employees indicate that getting enough sleep, eating healthy, managing stress, not spending beyond your means and making time for friends are all important to a person’s overall well-being.


For more information on this chart, please see the National Business Group on Health/Aon Hewitt/the Futures Company’s Consumer Health Mindset report.

Financial Concerns by Generation

While Millennials are more concerned about their finances in general, they are less concerned about the costs of health care than other generations.  

For more information on this chart, please see Aon Hewitt’s Financial Mindset Study report.

Allocation of Wellness Budget

As employers have become more invested in their wellness programs, how they invest their wellness budgets has changed. The majority of the wellness budget is allocated to program administration, incentives and staffing.

For more information on this chart, please see Optum's Sixth Annual Wellness in the Workplace Study report.

Emotional Health Programs

Through stress management programs, resiliency training and other initiatives, employers hope to help alleviate high levels of stress.


For more information on this chart, please see the National Business Group on Health/Fidelity Investments Employer-Sponsored Health & Well-being Survey report.

Social and Community Health Initiatives

Research has consistently shown that social and community-based initiatives can help to improve a person’s overall wellbeing, and supporting/promoting those types of initiatives can lead to increased workplace engagement.


For more information on this chart, please see the CECP and the Conference Board’s Giving in Numbers report

Financial Security Programs

Employers have always offered some benefits to help employees improve their financial security, but more recently employers have looked to bring those programs under their overall well-being umbrella.


For more information on this chart, please see the National Business Group on Health/Fidelity Investments Employer-Sponsored Health & Well-being Survey report.

The Value of a Culture of Health in the Workplace

Having a strong culture of health can be the deciding factor in whether programs will be successful or not. A strong culture of health impacts more than just participation, but also business metrics like recruitment and retention.


For more information on this chart, please see the National Business Group on Health/Aon Hewitt/the Futures Company’s Consumer Health Mindset report.

Physical Health Programs

Employers typically offer a whole suite of programs designed to help employees change their behaviors and improve their overall health. Often employers will use incentives to encourage employees to participate in these programs.


For more information on this chart, please see the National Business Group on Health/Fidelity Investments Employer-Sponsored Health & Well-being Survey report.

Metrics Being Used to Track the Value of Wellness Programs

In the past, many employers have evaluated the success of their wellness programs purely on participation rates and estimated health care cost savings. Now many employers are beginning to expand how they evaluate wellness to include productivity savings, changes in health risks and other business outcomes.

For more information on this chart, please see the National Business Group on Health/Optum’s Beyond ROI, Building the VOI Story for Health & Wellness report.

Prevalence and Maximum Amount of Wellness Incentives

Many large employers offer incentives to encourage employees to live healthier lifestyles. Over the last few years, employers have begun to extend a greater number of incentives to spouses and domestic partners.

For more information on this chart, please see the National Business Group on Health/Fidelity Investments’ Seventh Annual Employer-Sponsored Health & Well-being Survey report.

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